Child learning proper dental hygiene

It’s National Children’s Dental Health Month!

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month and we’re gearing up for a successful month of educating children on the importance of proper oral hygiene and its effects on our health. Creating awareness about this factor in our lives starts young. By developing good habits, children are more likely to adopt these habits and keep them as they grow older, which is why education and awareness is key.

About National Children’s Dental Health Month

Every February, dentists, orthodontists and other professionals in the field raise awareness about the importance of dental health in children by way of presentations in schools, literature and more. This month-long observance brings to light the benefits of proper oral hygiene and the consequences associated with not taking care of your teeth.

The movement began in Ohio in 1941 as a day-long observance, and in 1949, the American Dental Association followed suit. The single-day observance turned into a week-long affair in 1955, and in 1981, the national observance became a month-long observance with involvement from professionals from the across the country to better educate the young minds of America.

The Importance of Dental Health in Children

Starting awareness young is essential to the development of good habits among our youth. It’s imperative that children learn about the harmful effects poor oral hygiene has on our health. With improper oral care, we run the risk of developing:

  • Tooth decay
  • Gum disease
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Certain cancers

Promoting Proper Oral Health

So, how can you ensure your child is practicing good oral hygiene? It starts with you! Be sure your child is brushing and flossing correctly, and visit their dentist regularly for check-ups. If your child hasn’t visited the dentist in six months, it’s time to schedule an appointment.

Watch for details and information about upcoming awareness events at your child’s school. In February, dentists and other professionals, like Dr. Smith, will be visiting area schools to educate children about good habits and the importance of oral health.

Another aspect of keeping your child’s teeth and jaws healthy is having them see an orthodontist by age seven. Even though all of their adult teeth have not come in by that age, it’s the perfect time to start monitoring them for future treatment and to determine if early treatment, such as an appliance or partial set of braces, would better prepare their teeth and jaws for the arrival of the rest of their adult teeth.

Your Child’s Dental Health

As you can see, we’re excited for National Children’s Dental Health Month and the impact it has on our community. Together, we can raise awareness of the importance of oral hygiene for our children. Start your children young with good oral health habits and they’re more likely to grow up with habits that will benefit them for the rest of their lives.